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Ancient Igoudar, Southern Morocco

Ait Inlatten Granary (Agadir Ait Inlatten), Taliouine province of Southern Morocco, 24th May 2016. 

The Ait Inlatten ‘agadir’ (singular form of granary in Tamazert Amazigh dialect) is a fortified Berber collective granary which dates back to a time when many southern Amazigh tribes were still nomadic. 

With hundreds dotted about the southern regions alone, the structures embody a culmination of all the brilliant social and technical innovations of the Berber tribes. 

Notoriously impossible to siege, an agadir is usually placed on top of a mountain or carved into the rocks of dramatic escarpments, strategically located on higher ground beyond settlements, with good vantage points.  

These collective keeps were built out of necessity in a harsh environment and have become disused and abandoned as tribes have modernized. Their inaccessibility has made them difficult to repair and restore, with knowledge of the buildings slowly disappearing with them.

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Chris Griffiths
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Ancient Igoudar (Souss Massa Draa)
Ait Inlatten Granary (Agadir Ait Inlatten), Taliouine province of Southern Morocco, 24th May 2016. <br />

The Ait Inlatten ‘agadir’ (singular form of granary in Tamazert Amazigh dialect) is a fortified Berber collective granary which dates back to a time when many southern Amazigh tribes were still nomadic. <br />

With hundreds dotted about the southern regions alone, the structures embody a culmination of all the brilliant social and technical innovations of the Berber tribes. <br />
<br />
Notoriously impossible to siege, an agadir is usually placed on top of a mountain or carved into the rocks of dramatic escarpments, strategically located on higher ground beyond settlements, with good vantage points.  <br />

These collective keeps were built out of necessity in a harsh environment and have become disused and abandoned as tribes have modernized. Their inaccessibility has made them difficult to repair and restore, with knowledge of the buildings slowly disappearing with them.